Publications

FXPAL publishes in top scientific conferences and journals.

2010
Publication Details
  • IEEE Pervasive Computing. 9(2). 46-55.
  • Mar 15, 2010

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Paper is static but it is also light, flexible, robust, and has high resolution for reading documents in various scenarios. Digital devices will likely never match the flexibility of paper, but come with all of the benefits of computation and networking. Tags provide a simple means of bridging the gap between the two media to get the most out of both. In this paper, we explore the tradeoffs between two different types of tagging technologies – marker-based and content-based – through the lens of four systems we have developed and evaluated at our lab. From our experiences, we extrapolate issues for designers to consider when developing systems that transition between paper and digital content in a variety of different scenarios.

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Browsing and searching for documents in large, online enterprise document repositories are common activities. While internet search produces satisfying results for most user queries, enterprise search has not been as successful because of differences in document types and user requirements. To support users in finding the information they need in their online enterprise repository, we created DocuBrowse, a faceted document browsing and search system. Search results are presented within the user-created document hierarchy, showing only directories and documents matching selected facets and containing text query terms. In addition to file properties such as date and file size, automatically detected document types, or genres, serve as one of the search facets. Highlighting draws the user’s attention to the most promising directories and documents while thumbnail images and automatically identified keyphrases help select appropriate documents. DocuBrowse utilizes document similarities, browsing histories, and recommender system techniques to suggest additional promising documents for the current facet and content filters.
Publication Details
  • IUI 2010 Best Paper Award
  • Feb 7, 2010

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Embedded Media Markers, or simply EMMs, are nearly transparent iconic marks printed on paper documents that signify the existence of media associated with that part of the document. EMMs also guide users' camera operations for media retrieval. Users take a picture of an EMMsignified document patch using a cell phone, and the media associated with the EMM-signified document location is displayed on the phone. Unlike bar codes, EMMs are nearly transparent and thus do not interfere with the document contents. Retrieval of media associated with an EMM is based on image local features of the captured EMMsignified document patch. This paper describes a technique for semi-automatically placing an EMM at a location in a document, in such a way that it encompasses sufficient identification features with minimal disturbance to the original document.

Seamless Document Handling

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  • Fuji Xerox Technical Report, No.19, 2010, pp. 57-65.
  • Jan 12, 2010

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The current trend toward high-performance mobile networks and increasingly sophisticated mobile devices has fostered the growth of mobile workers. In mobile environments, an urgent need exists for handling documents using a mobile phone, especially for browsing documents and viewing Rich Contents created on computers. This paper describes Seamless Document Handling, which is a technology for viewing electronic documents and Rich Contents on the small screen of a mobile phone. To enhance operability and readability, we devised a method of scrolling documents efficiently by applying document image processing technology, and designed a novel user interface with a pan-and-zoom technique. We conducted on-site observations to test usability of the prototype, and gained insights difficult to acquire in a lab that led to improved functions in the prototype.
Publication Details
  • Fuji Xerox Technical Report No. 19, pp. 88-100
  • Jan 1, 2010

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Browsing and searching for documents in large, online enterprise document repositories is an increasingly common problem. While users are familiar and usually satisfied with Internet search results for information, enterprise search has not been as successful because of differences in data types and user requirements. To support users in finding the information they need from electronic and scanned documents in their online enterprise repository, we created an automatic detector for genres such as papers, slides, tables, and photos. Several of those genres correspond roughly to file name extensions but are identified automatically using features of the document. This genre identifier plays an important role in our faceted document browsing and search system. The system presents documents in a hierarchy as typically found in enterprise document collections. Documents and directories are filtered to show only documents matching selected facets and containing optional query terms and to highlight promising directories. Thumbnail images and automatically identified keyphrases help select desired documents.
2009

Quantum Computing

Publication Details
  • Entry in Wiley's The Handbook of Technology Management
  • Dec 31, 2009

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Changing the model underlying information and computation from a classical mechanical to a quantum mechanical one yields faster algorithms, novel cryptographic mechanisms, and alternative methods of communication. Quantum algorithms can perform a select set of tasks vastly more efficiently than any classical algorithm, but for many tasks it has been proven that quantum algorithms provide no advantage. The breadth of quantum computing applications is still being explored. Major application areas include security and the many fields that would benefit from efficient quantum simulation. The quantum information processing viewpoint provides insight into classical algorithmic issues as well as a deeper understanding of entanglement and other non-classical aspects of quantum physics.
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  • ACM Multimedia 2009 Workshop on Large-Scale Multimedia Retrieval and Mining
  • Oct 23, 2009

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We describe an efficient and scalable system for automatic image categorization. Our approach seeks to marry scalable “model-free” neighborhood-based annotation with accurate boosting-based per-tag modeling. For accelerated neighborhood-based classification, we use a set of spatial data structures as weak classifiers for an arbitrary number of categories. We employ standard edge and color features and an approximation scheme that scales to large training sets. The weak classifier outputs are combined in a tag-dependent fashion via boosting to improve accuracy. The method performs competitively with standard SVM-based per-tag classification with substantially reduced computational requirements. We present multi-label image annotation experiments using data sets of more than two million photos.

Marking up a World: Physical Markup for Virtual Content Creation (Video)

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  • ACM Multimedia
  • Oct 21, 2009

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The Pantheia system enables users to create virtual models by `marking up' the real world with pre-printed markers. The markers have prede fined meanings that guide the system as it creates models. Pantheia takes as input user captured images or video of the marked up space. This video illustrates the workings of the system and shows it being used to create three models, one of a cabinet, one of a lab, and one of a conference room. As part of the Pantheia system, we also developed a 3D viewer that spatially integrates a model with images of the model.
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  • ACM Multimedia 2009
  • Oct 19, 2009

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Existing cameraphone-based interactive paper systems fall short of the flexibility of GUIs, partly due to their deficient fine-grained interactions, limited interaction styles and inadequate targeted document types. We present PACER, a platform for applications to interact with document details (e.g. individual words, East Asian characters, math symbols, music notes, and user-specified arbitrary image regions) of generic paper documents through a camera phone. With a see-through phone interface, a user can discover symbol recurrences in a document by pointing the phone's crosshair to a symbol within a printout. The user can also continuously move the phone over a printout for gestures to copy and email an arbitrary region, or play music notes on the printout.
Publication Details
  • IJCSI International Journal of Computer Science Issues. Vol. 1.
  • Oct 15, 2009

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Reading documents on mobile devices is challenging. Not only are screens small and difficult to read, but also navigating an environment using limited visual attention can be difficult and potentially dangerous. Reading content aloud using text-to-speech (TTS) processing can mitigate these problems, but only for content that does not include rich visual information. In this paper, we introduce a new technique, SeeReader, that combines TTS with automatic content recognition and document presentation control that allows users to listen to documents while also being notified of important visual content. Together, these services allow users to read rich documents on mobile devices while maintaining awareness of their visual environment.
Publication Details
  • Book chapter in "Designing User Friendly Augmented Work Environments" Series: Computer Supported Cooperative Work Lahlou, Saadi (Ed.) 2009, Approx. 340 p. 117 illus., Hardcove
  • Sep 30, 2009

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The Usable Smart Environment project (USE) aims at designing easy-to-use, highly functional next-generation conference rooms. Our first design prototype focuses on creating a "no wizards" room for an American executive; that is, a room the executive could walk into and use by himself, without help from a technologist. A key idea in the USE framework is that customization is one of the best ways to create a smooth user experience. Since the system needs to fit both with the personal leadership style of the executive and the corporation's meeting culture, we began the design process by exploring the work flow in and around meetings attended by the executive. Based on our work flow analysis and the scenarios we developed from it, USE developed a flexible, extensible architecture specifically designed to enhance ease of use in smart environment technologies. The architecture allows customization and personalization of smart environments for particular people and groups, types of work, and specific physical spaces. The first USE room was designed for FXPAL's executive "Ian" and installed in Niji, a small executive conference room at FXPAL. The room Niji currently contains two large interactive whiteboards for projection of presentation material, for annotations using a digital whiteboard, or for teleconferencing; a Tandberg teleconferencing system; an RFID authentication plus biometric identification system; printing via network; a PDA-based simple controller, and a tabletop touch-screen console. The console is used for the USE room control interface, which controls and switches between all of the equipment mentioned above.
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  • ACM Mindtrek 2009
  • Sep 30, 2009

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Most mobile navigation systems focus on answering the question,“I know where I want to go, now can you show me exactly how to get there?” While this approach works well for many tasks, it is not as useful for unconstrained situations in which user goals and spatial landscapes are more fluid, such as festivals or conferences. In this paper we describe the design and iteration of the Kartta system, which we developed to answer a slightly different question: “What are the most interesting areas here and how do I find them?”

Publication Details
  • Mobile HCI 2009 (poster)
  • Sep 15, 2009

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Most mobile navigation systems focus on answering the question, "I know where I want to go, now can you show me exactly how to get there?" While this approach works well for many tasks, it is not as useful for unconstrained situations in which user goals and spatial landscapes are more fluid, such as festivals or conferences. In this paper we describe the design and iteration of the Kartta system, which we developed to answer a slightly different question: "What are the most interesting areas here and how do I find them?"
Publication Details
  • Book chapter in "Understanding the New Generation Office: Collective Intelligence of 100 Specialists" (book project in Japan, by New Era Office Research Center, Tokyo)
  • Aug 18, 2009

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A personal interface for information mash-up: exploring worlds both physical and virtual

Book chapter in "Understanding the New Generation Office: Collective Intelligence of 100 Specialists" (book project in Japan, by New Era Office Research Center, Tokyo) , August 18, 2009

This is a Big Idea piece for a collective intelligence book project by the New Era Office Research Center, Tokyo. It is written at the invitation of FX colleague Koushi Kawamoto. The project asks the same questions of 100 specialists: Answer these four questions about an idea for a next-generation workplace: 1. Want: what do I want to be able to do? 2. Should: what should a system to support this "want" be able to do? 3. Create: imagine what an instance of this idea might be. 4. Can: how could this instance be realized in reality?

WANT: In my ideal work environment, the data I need on everything and everyone should be available at my fingertips, all the time, in many configurations that I can mix-and-match to suit the needs of any task. This includes things like: • documents of all types • people's status, tasks, and availability • audio, video, mobile, and virtual world communication channels • links to the physical world as appropriate, for example sensors delivering factory data, or the state of the machines I use daily in the workplace (printers, my PC, conference room systems), or awareness data about my colleagues. CAN: How can we approach this problem? Let's consider the creation of a personal interface or instrument for information mashup, capable of interacting with complex data structures, for tuning smart environments, and for exploring worlds both physical and virtual, in business, social and personal realms. Like any interactive system this idea has two parts: human-facing and system-facing. These can be called Interstitia I (extending human interactivity) and Interstitia II (enabling smart environments).
Publication Details
  • Presentation at SIGGRAPH 2009, New Orleans, LA. ACM.
  • Aug 3, 2009

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FXPAL, a research lab in Silicon Valley, and TCHO, a chocolate manufacturer in San Francisco, have been collaborating on exploring emerging technologies for industry. The two companies seek ways to bring people closer to the products they consume, clarifying end-to-end production processes with technologies like sensor networks for fine-grained monitoring and control, mobile process control, and real/virtual mashups using virtual and augmented realities. This work lies within and extends the area of research called mixed- or cross-reality

Mirror World Chocolate Factory

Publication Details
  • IEEE Pervasive Computing July-August 2009 (Journal, Works in Progress section)
  • Jul 18, 2009

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FXPAL, a research lab in Silicon Valley, and TCHO, a chocolate manufacturer in San Francisco, have been collaborating on exploring emerging technologies for industry. The two companies seek ways to bring people closer to the products they consume, clarifying end-to-end production processes with technologies like sensor networks for fine-grained monitoring and control, mobile process control, and real/virtual mashups using virtual and augmented realities.

Interactive Models from Images of a Static Scene

Publication Details
  • Computer Graphics and Virtual Reality (CGVR '09)
  • Jul 13, 2009

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FXPAL's Pantheia system enables users to create virtual models by 'marking up' a physical space with pre-printed visual markers. The meanings associated with the markers come from a markup language that enables the system to create models from a relatively sparse set of markers. This paper describes extensions to our markup language and system that support the creation of interactive virtual objects. Users place markers to define components such as doors and drawers with which an end user of the model can interact. Other interactive elements, such as controls for color changes or lighting choices, are also supported. Pantheia produced a model of a room with hinged doors, a cabinet with drawers, doors, and color options, and a railroad track.
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  • 2009 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (ICME)
  • Jun 30, 2009

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This paper presents a tool and a novel Fast Invariant Transform (FIT) algorithm for language independent e-documents access. The tool enables a person to access an e-document through an informal camera capture of a document hardcopy. It can save people from remembering/exploring numerous directories and file names, or even going through many pages/paragraphs in one document. It can also facilitate people’s manipulation of a document or people’s interactions through documents. Additionally, the algorithm is useful for binding multimedia data to language independent paper documents. Our document recognition algorithm is inspired by the widely known SIFT descriptor [4] but can be computed much more efficiently for both descriptor construction and search. It also uses much less storage space than the SIFT approach. By testing our algorithm with randomly scaled and rotated document pages, we can achieve a 99.73% page recognition rate on the 2188-page ICME06 proceedings and 99.9% page recognition rate on a 504-page Japanese math book.

Image-based Lighting Adjustment Method for Browsing Object Images

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  • 2009 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (ICME)
  • Jun 30, 2009

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In this paper, we describe an automatic lighting adjustment method for browsing object images. From a set of images of an object, taken under different lighting conditions, we generate two types of illuminated images: a textural image which eliminates unwanted specular reflections of the object, and a highlight image in which specularities of the object are highly preserved. Our user interface allows viewers to digitally zoom into any region of the image, and the lighting adjusted images are automatically generated for the selected region and displayed. Switching between the textural and the highlight images helps viewers to understand characteristics of the object surface.

WebNC: efficient sharing of web applications

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  • Hypertext 2009
  • Jun 29, 2009

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WebNC is a system for efficiently sharing, retrieving and viewing web applications. Unlike existing screencasting and screensharing tools, WebNC is optimized to work with web pages where a lot of scrolling happens. WebNC uses a tile-based encoding to capture, transmit and deliver web applications, and relies only on dynamic HTML and JavaScript. The resulting webcasts require very little bandwidth and are viewable on any modern web browser including Firefox and Internet Explorer as well as browsers on the iPhone and Android platforms.
Publication Details
  • Journal article in Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing (2009), 23, 263-274. Printed in the USA. 2009 Cambridge University Press.
  • Jun 17, 2009

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Modern design embraces digital augmentation, especially in the interplay of digital media content and the physical dispersion and handling of information. Based on the observation that small paper memos with sticky backs (such as Post-Its ™) are a powerful and frequently used design tool, we have created Post-Bits, a new interface device with a physical embodiment that can be handled as naturally as paper sticky notes by designers, yet add digital information affordances as well. A Post-Bit is a design prototype of a small electronic paper device for handling multimedia content, with interaction control and display in one thin flexible sheet. Tangible properties of paper such as flipping, flexing, scattering, and rubbing are mapped to controlling aspects of the multimedia content such as scrubbing, sorting, or up- or downloading dynamic media (images, video, text). In this paper we discuss both the design process involved in building a prototype of a tangible interface using new technologies, and how the use of Post-Bits as a tangible design tool can impact two common design tasks: design ideation or brainstorming, and storyboarding for interactive systems or devices.
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  • Immerscom 2009
  • May 27, 2009

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We describe Pantheia, a system that constructs virtual models of real spaces from collections of images, through the use of visual markers that guide and constrain model construction. To create a model users simply `mark up' the real world scene by placing pre-printed markers that describe scene elements or impose semantic constraints. Users then collect still images or video of the scene. From this input, Pantheia automatically and quickly produces a model. The Pantheia system was used to produce models of two rooms that demonstrate the e ectiveness of the approach.
Publication Details
  • Pervasive 2009
  • May 11, 2009

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Recorded presentations are difficult to watch on a mobile phone because of the small screen, and even more challenging when the user is traveling or commuting. This demo shows an application designed for viewing presentations in a mobile situation, and describes the design process that involved on-site observation and informal user testing at our lab. The system generates a user-controllable movie by capturing a slide presentation, extracting active regions of interest using cues from the presenter, and creating pan-and-zoom effects to direct the active regions within a small screen. During playback, the user can simply watch the movie in automatic mode using a minimal amount of effort to operate the application. When more flexible control is needed, the user can switch into manual mode to temporarily focus on specific regions of interest.
Publication Details
  • ACM Transactions on Multimedia Computing, Communications and Applications, Vol. 5, Issue 2
  • May 1, 2009

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Hyper-Hitchcock consists of three components for creating and viewing a form of interactive video called detail-on-demand video: a hypervideo editor, a hypervideo player, and algorithms for automatically generating hypervideo summaries. Detail-on-demand video is a form of hypervideo that supports one hyperlink at a time for navigating between video sequences. The Hyper-Hitchcock editor enables authoring of detail-on-demand video without programming and uses video processing to aid in the authoring process. The Hyper-Hitchcock player uses labels and keyframes to support navigation through and back hyperlinks. Hyper-Hitchcock includes techniques for automatically generating hypervideo summaries of one or more videos that take the form of multiple linear summaries of different lengths with links from the shorter to the longer summaries. User studies on authoring and viewing provided insight into the various roles of links in hypervideo and found that player interface design greatly affects people's understanding of hypervideo structure and the video they access.

WebNC: efficient sharing of web applications

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  • WWW 2009
  • Apr 22, 2009

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WebNC is a browser plugin that leverages the Document Object Model for efficiently sharing web browser windows or recording web browsing sessions to be replayed later. Unlike existing screen-sharing or screencasting tools, WebNC is optimized to work with web pages where a lot of scrolling happens. Rendered pages are captured as image tiles, and transmitted to a central server through http post. Viewers can watch the webcasts in realtime or asynchronously using a standard web browser: WebNC only relies on html and javascript to reproduce the captured web content. Along with the visual content of web pages, WebNC also captures their layout and textual content for later retrieval. The resulting webcasts require very little bandwidth, are viewable on any modern web browser including the iPhone and Android phones, and are searchable by keyword.