Publications

By Tony Dunnigan (Clear Search)

2009

DICE: Designing Conference Rooms for Usability

Publication Details
  • In Proceedings of CHI 2009
  • Apr 4, 2009

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One of the core challenges now facing smart rooms is supporting realistic, everyday activities. While much research has been done to push forward the frontiers of novel interaction techniques, we argue that technology geared toward widespread adoption requires a design approach that emphasizes straightforward configuration and control, as well as flexibility. We examined the work practices of users of a large, multi-purpose conference room, and designed DICE, a system to help them use the room's capabilities. We describe the design process, and report findings about the system's usability and about people's use of a multi-purpose conference room.
2007

DOTS: Support for Effective Video Surveillance

Publication Details
  • Fuji Xerox Technical Report No. 17, pp. 83-100
  • Nov 1, 2007

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DOTS (Dynamic Object Tracking System) is an indoor, real-time, multi-camera surveillance system, deployed in a real office setting. DOTS combines video analysis and user interface components to enable security personnel to effectively monitor views of interest and to perform tasks such as tracking a person. The video analysis component performs feature-level foreground segmentation with reliable results even under complex conditions. It incorporates an efficient greedy-search approach for tracking multiple people through occlusion and combines results from individual cameras into multi-camera trajectories. The user interface draws the users' attention to important events that are indexed for easy reference. Different views within the user interface provide spatial information for easier navigation. DOTS, with over twenty video cameras installed in hallways and other public spaces in our office building, has been in constant use for a year. Our experiences led to many changes that improved performance in all system components.

DOTS: Support for Effective Video Surveillance

Publication Details
  • ACM Multimedia 2007, pp. 423-432
  • Sep 24, 2007

Abstract

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DOTS (Dynamic Object Tracking System) is an indoor, real-time, multi-camera surveillance system, deployed in a real office setting. DOTS combines video analysis and user interface components to enable security personnel to effectively monitor views of interest and to perform tasks such as tracking a person. The video analysis component performs feature-level foreground segmentation with reliable results even under complex conditions. It incorporates an efficient greedy-search approach for tracking multiple people through occlusion and combines results from individual cameras into multi-camera trajectories. The user interface draws the users' attention to important events that are indexed for easy reference. Different views within the user interface provide spatial information for easier navigation. DOTS, with over twenty video cameras installed in hallways and other public spaces in our office building, has been in constant use for a year. Our experiences led to many changes that improved performance in all system components.
Publication Details
  • ICME 2007, pp. 1015-1018
  • Jul 2, 2007

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We describe a new interaction technique that allows users to control nonlinear video playback by directly manipulating objects seen in the video. This interaction technique is simi-lar to video "scrubbing" where the user adjusts the playback time by moving the mouse along a slider. Our approach is superior to variable-scale scrubbing in that the user can con-centrate on interesting objects and does not have to guess how long the objects will stay in view. Our method relies on a video tracking system that tracks objects in fixed cameras, maps them into 3D space, and handles hand-offs between cameras. In addition to dragging objects visible in video windows, users may also drag iconic object representations on a floor plan. In that case, the best video views are se-lected for the dragged objects.

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3D renderings can often look cold and impersonal or even cartoonish. They can also appear too crisply detailed . This can cause viewers to concentrate on specific details when they should be focusing on a more general idea or concept. With the techniques covered in this tutorial you will be able to turn your 3D renderings into "hand drawn" looking illustrations.
Publication Details
  • PSD Magazine 2/2007 - Photoshop Art & Special Effects
  • Feb 1, 2007

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With the techniques covered in this tutorial you will be able to produce two classic visual effects. First, I'll show you how to make animated titles by importing Photoshop files into Aftereffects. Next we'll add new scenic elements to some video footage, again using Photoshop. This technique will allow you to add or remove elements like tree or buildings from a shot. These techniques, especially the one we will use to alter the scene, are common to most visual effects. Watch the classic old 1933 version of King Kong. Willis O'Brien, the stop motion genius that animated Kong, pioneered the art of extending, or completely fabricating, scenery. Layering several elements painted on glass in front his puppets and rear projected footage allowed O'brien and RKO's visual effects artist Linwood Dunn to create King Kong's fantastic jungle scenes. It is said that these set-ups could be many feet deep.
2006
Publication Details
  • In Proceedings of the fourth ACM International Workshop on Video Surveillance & Sensor Networks VSSN '06, Santa Barbara, CA, pp. 19-26
  • Oct 27, 2006

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Video surveillance systems have become common across a wide number of environments. While these installations have included more video streams, they also have been placed in contexts with limited personnel for monitoring the video feeds. In such settings, limited human attention, combined with the quantity of video, makes it difficult for security personnel to identify activities of interest and determine interrelationships between activities in different video streams. We have developed applications to support security personnel both in analyzing previously recorded video and in monitoring live video streams. For recorded video, we created storyboard visualizations that emphasize the most important activity as heuristically determined by the system. We also developed an interactive multi-channel video player application that connects camera views to map locations, alerts users to unusual and suspicious video, and visualizes unusual events along a timeline for later replay. We use different analysis techniques to determine unusual events and to highlight them in video images. These tools aid security personnel by directing their attention to the most important activity within recorded video or among several live video streams.

The USE Project: Designing Smart Spaces for Real People

Publication Details
  • UbiComp 2006 Workshop position paper
  • Sep 20, 2006

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We describe our work-in-progress: a "wizard-free" conference room designed for ease of use, yet retaining next-generation functionality. Called USE (Usable Smart Environments), our system uses multi-display systems, immersive conferencing, and secure authentication. It is based in cross-cultural ethnographic studies on the way people use conference rooms. The USE project has developed a flexible, extensible architecture specifically designed to enhance ease of use in smart environment technologies. The architecture allows customization and personalization of smart environments for particular people and groups, types of work, and specific physical spaces. The system consists of a database of devices with attributes, rooms and meetings that implements a prototype-instance inheritance mechanism through which contextual information (e.g. IP addresses application settings, phone numbers for teleconferencing systems, etc.) can be associated
2005
Publication Details
  • Video track, ACM Multimedia 2005.
  • Nov 13, 2005

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A Post-Bit is a prototype of a small ePaper device for handling multimedia content, combining interaction control and display into one package. Post-Bits are modeled after paper Post-Its™; the functions of each Post-Bit combine the affordances of physical tiny sticky memos and digital handling of information. Post-Bits enable us to arrange multimedia contents in our embodied physical spaces. Tangible properties of paper such as flipping, flexing, scattering and rubbing are mapped to controlling aspects of the content. In this paper, we introduce the integrated design and functionality of the Post-Bit system, including four main components: the ePaper sticky memo/player, with integrated sensors and connectors; a small container/binder that a few Post-Bits can fit into, for ordering and multiple connections; the data and power port that allows communication with the host com-puter; and finally the software and GUI interface that reside on the host PC and manage multimedia transfer.
Publication Details
  • http://www.strata.com/gallery_detail.asp?id=1480&page=1&category=48
  • Oct 1, 2005

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I produced these Illustrations for two multimedia applications that were developed by FX Palo Alto Laboratory and California State University at Sacramento's Department of Psychology. The applications were part of a study to see how primary school age children learn with certain multimedia tools. Each illustration was viewed as part of a fairly complex screen of information as well as on its own.