Publications

By Tony Dunnigan (Clear Search)

2016
Publication Details
  • CHI 2016 (Late Breaking Work)
  • May 7, 2016

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We describe a novel thermal haptic output device, ThermoTouch, that provides a grid of thermal pixels. Unlike previous devices which mainly use Peltier elements for thermal output, ThermoTouch uses liquid cooling and electro-resistive heating to output thermal feedback at arbitrary grid locations. We describe the design of the prototype, highlight advantages and disadvantages of the technique and briefly discuss future improvements and research applications.
2015

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New technology comes about in a number of different ways. It may come from advances in scientific research, through new combinations of existing technology, or by simply from imagining what might be possible in the future. This video describes the evolution of Tabletop Telepresence, a system for remote collaboration through desktop videoconferencing combined with a digital desk. Tabletop Telepresence provides a means to share paper documents between remote desktops, interact with documents and request services (such as translation), and communicate with a remote person through a teleconference. It was made possible by combining advances in camera/projector technology that enable a fully functional digital desk, embodied telepresence in video conferencing and concept art that imagines future workstyles.

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In this paper, we report findings from a study that compared basic video-conferencing, emergent kinetic video-conferencing techniques, and face-to-face meetings. In our study, remote and co-located participants worked together in groups of three. We show, in agreement with prior literature, the strong adverse impact of being remote on participation-levels. We also show that local and remote participants perceived differently their own contributions and others. Extending prior work, we also show that local participants exhibited significantly more overlapping speech with remote participants who used an embodied proxy, than with remote participants in basic-video conferencing (and at a rate similar to overlapping speech for co-located groups). We also describe differences in how the technologies were used to follow conversation. We discuss how these findings extend our understanding of the promise and potential limitations of embodied video-conferencing solutions.
2014
Publication Details
  • SUI-Symposium
  • Oct 4, 2014

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It is now possible to develop head-mounted devices (HMDs) that allow for ego-centric sensing of mid-air gestural input. Therefore, we explore the use of HMD-based gestural input techniques in smart space environments. We developed a usage scenario to evaluate HMD-based gestural interactions and conducted a user study to elicit qualitative feedback on several HMD-based gestural input techniques. Our results show that for the proposed scenario, mid-air hand gestures are preferred to head gestures for input and rated more favorably compared to non-gestural input techniques available on existing HMDs. Informed by these study results, we developed a prototype HMD system that supports gestural interactions as proposed in our scenario. We conducted a second user study to quantitatively evaluate our prototype comparing several gestural and non-gestural input techniques. The results of this study show no clear advantage or disadvantage of gestural inputs vs.~non-gestural input techniques on HMDs. We did find that voice control as (sole) input modality performed worst compared to the other input techniques we evaluated. Lastly, we present two further applications implemented with our system, demonstrating 3D scene viewing and ambient light control. We conclude by briefly discussing the implications of ego-centric vs.~exo-centric tracking for interaction in smart spaces.
Publication Details
  • International Journal of Multimedia Information Retrieval Special Issue on Cross-Media Analysis
  • Sep 4, 2014

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Media Embedded Target, or MET, is an iconic mark printed in a blank margin of a page that indicates a media link is associated with a nearby region of the page. It guides the user to capture the region and thus retrieve the associated link through visual search within indexed content. The target also serves to separate page regions with media links from other regions of the page. The capture application on the cell phone displays a sight having the same shape as the target near the edge of a camera-view display. The user moves the phone to align the sight with the target printed on the page. Once the system detects correct sight-target alignment, the region in the camera view is captured and sent to the recognition engine which identifies the image and causes the associated media to be displayed on the phone. Since target and sight alignment defines a capture region, this approach saves storage by only indexing visual features in the predefined capture region, rather than indexing the entire page. Target-sight alignment assures that the indexed region is fully captured. We compare the use of MET for guiding capture with two standard methods: one that uses a logo to indicate that media content is available and text to define the capture region and another that explicitly indicates the capture region using a visible boundary mark.
Publication Details
  • SIGIR 2014
  • Jul 6, 2014
  • pp. pp.495-504

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People often use more than one query when searching for information. They revisit search results to re-find information and build an understanding of their search need through iterative explorations of query formulation. These tasks are not well-supported by search interfaces and web browsers. We designed and built SearchPanel, a Chrome browser extension that helps people manage their ongoing information seeking. This extension combines document and process metadata into an interactive representation of the retrieved documents that can be used for sense-making, navigation, and re-finding documents. In a real-world deployment spanning over two months, results show that SearchPanel appears to have been primarily used for complex information needs, in search sessions with long durations and high numbers of queries. The process metadata features in SearchPanel seem to be of particular importance when working on complex information needs.
2013
Publication Details
  • SIGIR 2013
  • Jul 28, 2013

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Exploratory search is a complex, iterative information seeking activity that involves running multiple queries, finding and examining many documents. We introduced a query preview interface that visualizes the distribution of newly-retrieved and re-retrieved documents prior to showing the detailed query results. When evaluating the preview control with a control condition, we found effects on both people’s information seeking behavior and improved retrieval performance. People spent more time formulating a query and were more likely to explore search results more deeply, retrieved a more diverse set of documents, and found more different relevant documents when using the preview. With more time spent on query formulation, higher quality queries were produced and as consequence the retrieval results improved; both average residual precision and recall was higher with the query preview present.
2012
Publication Details
  • Mobile HCI 2012 demo track
  • Sep 21, 2012

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In this demonstration we will show a mobile remote control and monitoring application for a recipe development laboratory at a local chocolate production company. In collaboration with TCHO, a chocolate maker in San Francisco, we built a mobile Web app designed to allow chocolate makers to control their laboratory's machines. Sensor data is imported into the app from each machine in the lab. The mobile Web app is used for control, monitoring, and collaboration. We have tested and deployed this system at the real-world factory and it is now in daily use. This project is designed as part of a research exploration into enhanced collaboration in industrial settings between physically remote people and places, e.g. factories in China with clients in the US.
Publication Details
  • IIiX 2012
  • Aug 21, 2012

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Exploratory search activities tend to span multiple sessions and involve finding, analyzing and evaluating information and collab-orating with others. Typical search systems, on the other hand, are designed to support a single searcher, precision-oriented search tasks. We describe a search interface and system design of a multi-session exploratory search system, discuss design challenges en-countered, and chronicle the evolution of our design. Our design describes novel displays for visualizing retrieval history infor-mation, and introduces ambient displays and persuasive elements to interactive information retrieval.
Publication Details
  • DIS (Designing Interactive Systems) 2012 Demos track
  • Jun 11, 2012

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We will demonstrate successive and final stages in the iterative design of a complex mixed reality system in a real-world factory setting. In collaboration with TCHO, a chocolate maker in San Francisco, we built a virtual “mirror” world of a real-world chocolate factory and its processes. Sensor data is imported into the multi-user 3D environment from hundreds of sensors and a number of cameras on the factory floor. The resulting virtual factory is used for simulation, visualization, and collaboration, using a set of interlinked, real-time layers of information. It can be a stand-alone or a web-based application, and also works on iOS and Android cell phones and tablet computers. A unique aspect of our system is that it is designed to enable the incorporation of lightweight social media-style interactions with co-workers along with factory data. Through this mixture of mobile, social, mixed and virtual technologies, we hope to create systems for enhanced collaboration in industrial settings between physically remote people and places, such as factories in China with managers in the US.

Designing a tool for exploratory information seeking

Publication Details
  • CHI 2012
  • May 5, 2012

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In this paper we describe our on-going design process in building a search system designed to support people's multi-session exploratory search tasks. The system, called Querium, allows people to run queries and to examine results as do conventional search engines, but it also integrates a sophisticated search history that helps people make sense of their search activity over time. Information seeking is a cognitively demanding process that can benefit from many kinds of information, if that information is presented appropriately. Our design process has been focusing on creating displays that facilitate on-going sense-making while keeping the interaction efficient, fluid, and enjoyable.

Querium: A Session-Based Collaborative Search System

Publication Details
  • European Conference on Information Retrieval 2012
  • Apr 1, 2012

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People's information-seeking can span multiple sessions, and can be collaborative in nature. Existing commercial offerings do not effectively support searchers to share, save, collaborate or revisit their information. In this demo paper we present Querium: a novel session-based collaborative search system that lets users search, share, resume and collaborate with other users. Querium provides a number of novel search features in a collaborative setting, including relevance feedback, query fusion, faceted search, and search histories
2011
Publication Details
  • ACM Multimedia Industrial Exhibit
  • Nov 28, 2011

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The Active Reading Application (ARA) brings the familiar experience of writing on paper to the tablet. The application augments paper-based practices with audio, the ability to review annotations, and sharing. It is designed to make it easier to review, annotate, and comment on documents by individuals and groups. ARA incorporates several patented technologies and draws on several years of research and experimentation.
Publication Details
  • Fuji Xerox Technical Report
  • Jan 1, 2011

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Embedded Media Markers, or simply EMMs, are nearly transparent iconic marks printed on paper documents that signify the existence of media associated with that part of the document. EMMs also guide users' camera operations for media retrieval. Users take a picture of an EMM-signified document patch using a cell phone, and the media associated with the EMM-signified document location is displayed on the phone. Unlike bar codes, EMMs are nearly transparent and thus do not interfere with the document appearance. Retrieval of media associated with an EMM is based on image local features of the captured EMM-signified document patch. This paper describes a technique for semi-automatically placing an EMM at a location in a document, in such a way that it encompasses sufficient identification features with minimal disturbance to the original document.
2010
Publication Details
  • ACM International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces
  • Nov 8, 2010

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Embedded Media Barcode Links, or simply EMBLs, are optimally blended iconic barcode marks, printed on paper documents, that signify the existence of multimedia associated with that part of the document content (Figure 1). EMBLs are used for multimedia retrieval with a camera phone. Users take a picture of an EMBL-signified document patch using a cell phone, and the multimedia associated with the EMBL-signified document location is displayed on the phone. Unlike a traditional barcode which requires an exclusive space, the EMBL construction algorithm acts as an agent to negotiate with a barcode reader for maximum user and document benefits. Because of this negotiation, EMBLs are optimally blended with content and thus have less interference with the original document layout and can be moved closer to a media associated location. Retrieval of media associated with an EMBL is based on the barcode identification of a captured EMBL. Therefore, EMBL retains nearly all barcode identification advantages, such as accuracy, speed, and scalability. Moreover, EMBL takes advantage of users' knowledge of a traditional barcode. Unlike Embedded Media Maker (EMM) which requires underlying document features for marker identification, EMBL has no requirement for the underlying features. This paper will discuss the procedures for EMBL construction and optimization. It will also give experimental results that strongly support the EMBL construction and optimization ideas.

The Virtual Chocolate Factory:Mixed Reality Industrial Collaboration and Control

Publication Details
  • ACM Multimedia 2010 - Industrial Exhibits
  • Oct 25, 2010

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We will exhibit several aspects of a complex mixed reality system that we have built and deployed in a real-world factory setting. In our system, virtual worlds, augmented realities, and mobile applications are all fed from the same infrastructure. In collaboration with TCHO, a chocolate maker in San Francisco, we built a virtual “mirror” world of a real-world chocolate factory and its processes. Sensor data is imported into the multi-user 3D environment from hundreds of sensors on the factory floor. The resulting virtual factory is used for simulation, visualization, and collaboration, using a set of interlinked, real-time layers of information. Another part of our infrastructure is designed to support appropriate industrial uses for mobile devices such as cell phones and tablet computers. We deployed this system at the real-world factory in 2009, and it is now is daily use there. By simultaneously developing mobile, virtual, and web-based display and collaboration environments, we aimed to create an infrastructure that did not skew toward one type of application but that could serve many at once, interchangeably. Through this mixture of mobile, social, mixed and virtual technologies, we hope to create systems for enhanced collaboration in industrial settings between physically remote people and places, such as factories in China with managers in the US.
Publication Details
  • ACM Multimedia 2010
  • Oct 25, 2010

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An Embedded Media Marker (EMM) is a transparent mark printed on a paper document that signifies the availability of additional media associated with that part of the document. Users take a picture of the EMM using a camera phone, and the media associated with that part of the document is displayed on the phone. Unlike bar codes, EMMs are nearly transparent and thus do not interfere with the document appearance. Retrieval of media associated with an EMM is based on image features of the document within the EMM boundary. Unlike other feature-based retrieval methods, the EMM clearly indicates to the user the existence and type of media associated with the document location. A semi-automatic authoring tool is used to place an EMM at a location in a document, in such a way that it encompasses sufficient identification features with minimal disturbance to the original document. We will demonstrate how to create an EMM-enhanced document, and how the EMM enables access to the associated media on a cell phone.
Publication Details
  • ICME 2010, Singapore, July 19-23 2010
  • Jul 19, 2010

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Virtual, mobile, and mixed reality systems have diverse uses for data visualization and remote collaboration in industrial settings, especially factories. We report our experiences in designing complex mixed-reality collaboration, control, and display systems for a real-world factory, for delivering real-time factory information to multiple users. In collaboration with (blank for review), a chocolate maker in San Francisco, our research group is building a virtual “mirror” world of a real-world chocolate factory and its processes. Real-world sensor data (such as temperature and machine state) is imported into the 3D environment from hundreds of sensors on the factory floor. Multi-camera imagery from the factory is also available in the multi-user 3D factory environment. The resulting "virtual factory" is designed for simulation, visualization, and collaboration, using a set of interlinked, real-time 3D and 2D layers of information about the factory and its processes. We are also looking at appropriate industrial uses for mobile devices such as cell phones and tablet computers, and how they intersect with virtual worlds and mixed realities. For example, an experimental iPhone web app provides mobile laboratory monitoring and control. The app allows a real-time view into the lab via steerable camera and remote control of lab machines. The mobile system is integrated with the database underlying the virtual factory world. These systems were deployed at the real-world factory and lab in 2009, and are now in beta development. Through this mashup of mobile, social, mixed and virtual technologies, we hope to create industrial systems for enhanced collaboration between physically remote people and places – for example, factories in China with managers in Japan or the US.
Publication Details
  • Symposium on Eye Tracking Research and Applications 2010
  • Mar 22, 2010

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In certain applications such as radiology and imagery analysis, it is important to minimize errors. In this paper we evaluate a structured inspection method that uses eye tracking information as a feedback mechanism to the image inspector. Our two-phase method starts with a free viewing phase during which gaze data is collected. During the next phase, we either segment the image, mask previously seen areas of the image, or combine the two techniques, and repeat the search. We compare the different methods proposed for the second search phase by evaluating the inspection method using true positive and false negative rates, and subjective workload. Results show that gaze-blocked configurations reduced the subjective workload, and that gaze-blocking without segmentation showed the largest increase in true positive identifications and the largest decrease in false negative identifications of previously unseen objects.
Publication Details
  • IEEE Virtual Reality 2010 conference
  • Mar 19, 2010

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This project investigates practical uses of virtual, mobile, and mixed reality systems in industrial settings, in particular control and collaboration applications for factories. In collaboration with TCHO, a chocolate maker start-up in San Francisco, we have built virtual mirror-world representations of a real-world chocolate factory and are importing its data and modeling its processes. The system integrates mobile devices such as cell phones and tablet computers. The resulting "virtual factory" is a cross-reality environment designed for simulation, visualization, and collaboration, using a set of interlinked, real-time 3D and 2D layers of information about the factory and its processes.
Publication Details
  • IUI 2010 Best Paper Award
  • Feb 7, 2010

Abstract

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Embedded Media Markers, or simply EMMs, are nearly transparent iconic marks printed on paper documents that signify the existence of media associated with that part of the document. EMMs also guide users' camera operations for media retrieval. Users take a picture of an EMMsignified document patch using a cell phone, and the media associated with the EMM-signified document location is displayed on the phone. Unlike bar codes, EMMs are nearly transparent and thus do not interfere with the document contents. Retrieval of media associated with an EMM is based on image local features of the captured EMMsignified document patch. This paper describes a technique for semi-automatically placing an EMM at a location in a document, in such a way that it encompasses sufficient identification features with minimal disturbance to the original document.
2009
Publication Details
  • Book chapter in "Designing User Friendly Augmented Work Environments" Series: Computer Supported Cooperative Work Lahlou, Saadi (Ed.) 2009, Approx. 340 p. 117 illus., Hardcove
  • Sep 30, 2009

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The Usable Smart Environment project (USE) aims at designing easy-to-use, highly functional next-generation conference rooms. Our first design prototype focuses on creating a "no wizards" room for an American executive; that is, a room the executive could walk into and use by himself, without help from a technologist. A key idea in the USE framework is that customization is one of the best ways to create a smooth user experience. Since the system needs to fit both with the personal leadership style of the executive and the corporation's meeting culture, we began the design process by exploring the work flow in and around meetings attended by the executive. Based on our work flow analysis and the scenarios we developed from it, USE developed a flexible, extensible architecture specifically designed to enhance ease of use in smart environment technologies. The architecture allows customization and personalization of smart environments for particular people and groups, types of work, and specific physical spaces. The first USE room was designed for FXPAL's executive "Ian" and installed in Niji, a small executive conference room at FXPAL. The room Niji currently contains two large interactive whiteboards for projection of presentation material, for annotations using a digital whiteboard, or for teleconferencing; a Tandberg teleconferencing system; an RFID authentication plus biometric identification system; printing via network; a PDA-based simple controller, and a tabletop touch-screen console. The console is used for the USE room control interface, which controls and switches between all of the equipment mentioned above.
Publication Details
  • Presentation at SIGGRAPH 2009, New Orleans, LA. ACM.
  • Aug 3, 2009

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FXPAL, a research lab in Silicon Valley, and TCHO, a chocolate manufacturer in San Francisco, have been collaborating on exploring emerging technologies for industry. The two companies seek ways to bring people closer to the products they consume, clarifying end-to-end production processes with technologies like sensor networks for fine-grained monitoring and control, mobile process control, and real/virtual mashups using virtual and augmented realities. This work lies within and extends the area of research called mixed- or cross-reality

Mirror World Chocolate Factory

Publication Details
  • IEEE Pervasive Computing July-August 2009 (Journal, Works in Progress section)
  • Jul 18, 2009

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FXPAL, a research lab in Silicon Valley, and TCHO, a chocolate manufacturer in San Francisco, have been collaborating on exploring emerging technologies for industry. The two companies seek ways to bring people closer to the products they consume, clarifying end-to-end production processes with technologies like sensor networks for fine-grained monitoring and control, mobile process control, and real/virtual mashups using virtual and augmented realities.
Publication Details
  • Journal article in Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing (2009), 23, 263-274. Printed in the USA. 2009 Cambridge University Press.
  • Jun 17, 2009

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Modern design embraces digital augmentation, especially in the interplay of digital media content and the physical dispersion and handling of information. Based on the observation that small paper memos with sticky backs (such as Post-Its ™) are a powerful and frequently used design tool, we have created Post-Bits, a new interface device with a physical embodiment that can be handled as naturally as paper sticky notes by designers, yet add digital information affordances as well. A Post-Bit is a design prototype of a small electronic paper device for handling multimedia content, with interaction control and display in one thin flexible sheet. Tangible properties of paper such as flipping, flexing, scattering, and rubbing are mapped to controlling aspects of the multimedia content such as scrubbing, sorting, or up- or downloading dynamic media (images, video, text). In this paper we discuss both the design process involved in building a prototype of a tangible interface using new technologies, and how the use of Post-Bits as a tangible design tool can impact two common design tasks: design ideation or brainstorming, and storyboarding for interactive systems or devices.
Publication Details
  • In Proceedings of CHI 2009
  • Apr 4, 2009

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One of the core challenges now facing smart rooms is supporting realistic, everyday activities. While much research has been done to push forward the frontiers of novel interaction techniques, we argue that technology geared toward widespread adoption requires a design approach that emphasizes straightforward configuration and control, as well as flexibility. We examined the work practices of users of a large, multi-purpose conference room, and designed DICE, a system to help them use the room's capabilities. We describe the design process, and report findings about the system's usability and about people's use of a multi-purpose conference room.
2007

DOTS: Support for Effective Video Surveillance

Publication Details
  • Fuji Xerox Technical Report No. 17, pp. 83-100
  • Nov 1, 2007

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DOTS (Dynamic Object Tracking System) is an indoor, real-time, multi-camera surveillance system, deployed in a real office setting. DOTS combines video analysis and user interface components to enable security personnel to effectively monitor views of interest and to perform tasks such as tracking a person. The video analysis component performs feature-level foreground segmentation with reliable results even under complex conditions. It incorporates an efficient greedy-search approach for tracking multiple people through occlusion and combines results from individual cameras into multi-camera trajectories. The user interface draws the users' attention to important events that are indexed for easy reference. Different views within the user interface provide spatial information for easier navigation. DOTS, with over twenty video cameras installed in hallways and other public spaces in our office building, has been in constant use for a year. Our experiences led to many changes that improved performance in all system components.

DOTS: Support for Effective Video Surveillance

Publication Details
  • ACM Multimedia 2007, pp. 423-432
  • Sep 24, 2007

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DOTS (Dynamic Object Tracking System) is an indoor, real-time, multi-camera surveillance system, deployed in a real office setting. DOTS combines video analysis and user interface components to enable security personnel to effectively monitor views of interest and to perform tasks such as tracking a person. The video analysis component performs feature-level foreground segmentation with reliable results even under complex conditions. It incorporates an efficient greedy-search approach for tracking multiple people through occlusion and combines results from individual cameras into multi-camera trajectories. The user interface draws the users' attention to important events that are indexed for easy reference. Different views within the user interface provide spatial information for easier navigation. DOTS, with over twenty video cameras installed in hallways and other public spaces in our office building, has been in constant use for a year. Our experiences led to many changes that improved performance in all system components.
Publication Details
  • ICME 2007, pp. 1015-1018
  • Jul 2, 2007

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We describe a new interaction technique that allows users to control nonlinear video playback by directly manipulating objects seen in the video. This interaction technique is simi-lar to video "scrubbing" where the user adjusts the playback time by moving the mouse along a slider. Our approach is superior to variable-scale scrubbing in that the user can con-centrate on interesting objects and does not have to guess how long the objects will stay in view. Our method relies on a video tracking system that tracks objects in fixed cameras, maps them into 3D space, and handles hand-offs between cameras. In addition to dragging objects visible in video windows, users may also drag iconic object representations on a floor plan. In that case, the best video views are se-lected for the dragged objects.

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3D renderings can often look cold and impersonal or even cartoonish. They can also appear too crisply detailed . This can cause viewers to concentrate on specific details when they should be focusing on a more general idea or concept. With the techniques covered in this tutorial you will be able to turn your 3D renderings into "hand drawn" looking illustrations.
Publication Details
  • PSD Magazine 2/2007 - Photoshop Art & Special Effects
  • Feb 1, 2007

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With the techniques covered in this tutorial you will be able to produce two classic visual effects. First, I'll show you how to make animated titles by importing Photoshop files into Aftereffects. Next we'll add new scenic elements to some video footage, again using Photoshop. This technique will allow you to add or remove elements like tree or buildings from a shot. These techniques, especially the one we will use to alter the scene, are common to most visual effects. Watch the classic old 1933 version of King Kong. Willis O'Brien, the stop motion genius that animated Kong, pioneered the art of extending, or completely fabricating, scenery. Layering several elements painted on glass in front his puppets and rear projected footage allowed O'brien and RKO's visual effects artist Linwood Dunn to create King Kong's fantastic jungle scenes. It is said that these set-ups could be many feet deep.
2006
Publication Details
  • In Proceedings of the fourth ACM International Workshop on Video Surveillance & Sensor Networks VSSN '06, Santa Barbara, CA, pp. 19-26
  • Oct 27, 2006

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Video surveillance systems have become common across a wide number of environments. While these installations have included more video streams, they also have been placed in contexts with limited personnel for monitoring the video feeds. In such settings, limited human attention, combined with the quantity of video, makes it difficult for security personnel to identify activities of interest and determine interrelationships between activities in different video streams. We have developed applications to support security personnel both in analyzing previously recorded video and in monitoring live video streams. For recorded video, we created storyboard visualizations that emphasize the most important activity as heuristically determined by the system. We also developed an interactive multi-channel video player application that connects camera views to map locations, alerts users to unusual and suspicious video, and visualizes unusual events along a timeline for later replay. We use different analysis techniques to determine unusual events and to highlight them in video images. These tools aid security personnel by directing their attention to the most important activity within recorded video or among several live video streams.
Publication Details
  • UbiComp 2006 Workshop position paper
  • Sep 20, 2006

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We describe our work-in-progress: a "wizard-free" conference room designed for ease of use, yet retaining next-generation functionality. Called USE (Usable Smart Environments), our system uses multi-display systems, immersive conferencing, and secure authentication. It is based in cross-cultural ethnographic studies on the way people use conference rooms. The USE project has developed a flexible, extensible architecture specifically designed to enhance ease of use in smart environment technologies. The architecture allows customization and personalization of smart environments for particular people and groups, types of work, and specific physical spaces. The system consists of a database of devices with attributes, rooms and meetings that implements a prototype-instance inheritance mechanism through which contextual information (e.g. IP addresses application settings, phone numbers for teleconferencing systems, etc.) can be associated
2005
Publication Details
  • Video track, ACM Multimedia 2005.
  • Nov 13, 2005

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A Post-Bit is a prototype of a small ePaper device for handling multimedia content, combining interaction control and display into one package. Post-Bits are modeled after paper Post-Its™; the functions of each Post-Bit combine the affordances of physical tiny sticky memos and digital handling of information. Post-Bits enable us to arrange multimedia contents in our embodied physical spaces. Tangible properties of paper such as flipping, flexing, scattering and rubbing are mapped to controlling aspects of the content. In this paper, we introduce the integrated design and functionality of the Post-Bit system, including four main components: the ePaper sticky memo/player, with integrated sensors and connectors; a small container/binder that a few Post-Bits can fit into, for ordering and multiple connections; the data and power port that allows communication with the host com-puter; and finally the software and GUI interface that reside on the host PC and manage multimedia transfer.
Publication Details
  • http://www.strata.com/gallery_detail.asp?id=1480&page=1&category=48
  • Oct 1, 2005

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I produced these Illustrations for two multimedia applications that were developed by FX Palo Alto Laboratory and California State University at Sacramento's Department of Psychology. The applications were part of a study to see how primary school age children learn with certain multimedia tools. Each illustration was viewed as part of a fairly complex screen of information as well as on its own.