Publications

By Patrick Chiu (Clear Search)

2001
2000

A Semi-Automatic Approach to Home Video Editing.

Publication Details
  • In Proceedings of UIST '00, ACM Press, pp. 81-89, 2000.
  • Nov 4, 2000

Abstract

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Hitchcock is a system that allows users to easily create custom videos from raw video shot with a standard video camera. In contrast to other video editing systems, Hitchcock uses automatic analysis to determine the suitability of portions of the raw video. Unsuitable video typically has fast or erratic camera motion. Hitchcock first analyzes video to identify the type and amount of camera motion: fast pan, slow zoom, etc. Based on this analysis, a numerical "unsuitability" score is computed for each frame of the video. Combined with standard editing rules, this score is used to identify clips for inclusion in the final video and to select their start and end points. To create a custom video, the user drags keyframes corresponding to the desired clips into a storyboard. Users can lengthen or shorten the clip without specifying the start and end frames explicitly. Clip lengths are balanced automatically using a spring-based algorithm.
Publication Details
  • In Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo, vol. III, pp. 1329-1332, 2000.
  • Jul 30, 2000

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We describe a genetic segmentation algorithm for video. This algorithm operates on segments of a string representation. It is similar to both classical genetic algorithms that operate on bits of a string and genetic grouping algorithms that operate on subsets of a set. For evaluating segmentations, we define similarity adjacency functions, which are extremely expensive to optimize with traditional methods. The evolutionary nature of genetic algorithms offers a further advantage by enabling incremental segmentation. Applications include video summarization and indexing for browsing, plus adapting to user access patterns.
Publication Details
  • In Proceedings of the Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, pp. 666-673, 2000.
  • Jul 8, 2000

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We describe a genetic segmentation algorithm for image data streams and video. This algorithm operates on segments of a string representation. It is similar to both classical genetic algorithms that operate on bits of a string and genetic grouping algorithms that operate on subsets of a set. It employs a segment fair crossover operation. For evaluating segmentations, we define similarity adjacency functions, which are extremely expensive to optimize with traditional methods. The evolutionary nature of genetic algorithms offers a further advantage by enabling incremental segmentation. Applications include browsing and summarizing video and collections of visually rich documents, plus a way of adapting to user access patterns.
Publication Details
  • In Proceedings of Hypertext '00, ACM Press, pp. 244-245, 2000.
  • May 30, 2000

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We describe a way to make a hypermedia meeting record from multimedia meeting documents by automatically generating links through image matching. In particular, we look at video recordings and scanned paper handouts of presentation slides with ink annotations. The algorithm that we employ is the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT). Interactions with multipath links and paper interfaces are discussed.
1999
Publication Details
  • In Proceedings of ACM Multimedia '99, Orlando, Florida, November 1999.
  • Oct 30, 1999

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NoteLook is a client-server system designed and built to support multimedia note taking in meetings with digital video and ink. It is integrated into a conference room equipped with computer controllable video cameras, video conference camera, and a large display rear video projector. The NoteLook client application runs on wireless pen-based notebook computers. Video channels containing images of the room activity and presentation material are transmitted by the NoteLook servers to the clients, and the images can be interactively and automatically incorporated into the note pages. Users can select channels, snap in large background images and sequences of thumbnails, and write freeform ink notes. A smart video source management component enables the capture of high quality images of the presentation material from a variety of sources. For accessing and browsing the notes and recorded video, NoteLook generates Web pages with links from the images and ink strokes correlated to the video.
Publication Details
  • In Proceedings of the Second International Workshop on Cooperative Buildings (CoBuild'99). Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 1670 Springer-Verlag, pp. 79-88, 1999.
  • Oct 1, 1999

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We describe a media enriched conference room designed for capturing meetings. Our goal is to do this in a flexible, seamless, and unobtrusive manner in a public conference room that is used for everyday work. Room activity is captured by computer controllable video cameras, video conference cameras, and ceiling microphones. Presentation material displayed on a large screen rear video projector is captured by a smart video source management component that automatically locates the highest fidelity image source. Wireless pen-based notebook computers are used to take notes, which provide indexes to the captured meeting. Images can be interactively and automatically incorporated into the notes. Captured meetings may be browsed on the Web with links to recorded video.
1998
Publication Details
  • UIST '98, ACM Press, 1998, pp. 195-202.
  • Oct 31, 1998

Abstract

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In this paper, we describe a technique for dynamically grouping digital ink and audio to support user interaction in freeform note-taking systems. For ink, groups of strokes might correspond to words, lines, or paragraphs of handwritten text. For audio, groups might be a complete spoken phrase or a speaker turn in a conversation. Ink and audio grouping is important for editing operations such as deleting or moving chunks of ink and audio notes. The grouping technique is based on hierarchical agglomerative clustering. This clustering algorithm yields groups of ink or audio in a range of sizes, depending on the level in the hierarchy, and thus provides structure for simple interactive selection and rapid non-linear expansion of a selection. Ink and audio grouping is also important for marking portions of notes for subsequent browsing and retrieval. Integration of the ink and audio clusters provides a flexible way to browse the notes by selecting the ink cluster and playing the corresponding audio cluster.