Publications

By John Boreczky (Clear Search)

1998
Publication Details
  • MULTIMEDIA '98, ACM Press, 1998, pp. 375-380.
  • Sep 14, 1998

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Many techniques can extract information from an multimedia stream, such as speaker identity or shot boundaries. We present a browser that uses this information to navigate through stored media. Because automatically-derived information is not wholly reliable, it is transformed into a time-dependent "confidence score." When presented graphically, confidence scores enable users to make informed decisions about regions of interest in the media, so that non-interesting areas may be skipped. Additionally, index points may be determined automatically for easy navigation, selection, editing, and annotation and will support analysis types other than the speaker identification and shot detection used here.
Publication Details
  • Proceedings of the International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (Seattle, WA), Vol. 6, 1998, pp. 3741-3744.
  • May 12, 1998

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This paper describes a technique for segmenting video using hidden Markov models (HMM). Video is segmented into regions defined by shots, shot boundaries, and camera movement within shots. Features for segmentation include an image-based distance between adjacent video frames, an audio distance based on the acoustic difference in intervals just before and after the frames, and an estimate of motion between the two frames. Typical video segmentation algorithms classify shot boundaries by computing an image-based distance between adjacent frames and comparing this distance to fixed, manually determined thresholds. Motion and audio information is used separately. In contrast, our segmentation technique allows features to be combined within the HMM framework. Further, thresholds are not required since automatically trained HMMs take their place. This algorithm has been tested on a video data base, and has been shown to improve the accuracy of video segmentation over standard threshold-based systems.
Publication Details
  • In Proceedings of the Thirty-first Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (Wailea, Hawaii, January 1998), Volume II, pp. 259-267.
  • Feb 6, 1998

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In this paper we describe a method for indexing and retrieval of multimedia data based on annotation and segmentation. Our goal is the retrieval of segments of audio and video suitable for inclusion in multimedia documents. Annotation refers to the association of text data with particular time locations of the media. Segmentation is the partitioning of continuous media into homogenous regions. Retrieval is performed over segments of the media using the annotations associated with the segments. We present two scenarios that describe how these techniques might be applied. In the first, we describe how excerpts from a video-taped usage study of a new device are located for inclusion in a report on the utility of the device. In the second, we show how sound bites from a recorded meeting are obtained for use in authoring a summary of the meeting.

AESOP: An Outline-Oriented Authoring System.

Publication Details
  • In Proceedings of the Thirty-first Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (Wailea, Hawaii, January 1998), Volume II, pp. 207-215.
  • Feb 6, 1998

Abstract

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Because a hypermedia document is more complex than conventional text, it requires preparation with respect to two key aspects. First, the author begins to develop a "vision" of the document-usually based on some outline-level description of his objectives. At the same time, as this outline is being developed, the author begins to extract useful segments from his resource materials and prepares his first version of the logic of a system of hyperlinks among those segments. In this paper we present a system named "Authoring Environment for the deSktOP" (AESOP) with two different types of "outlining" tools to handle these aspects. Planning the "vision" consists in defining a "logical" tree structure of the document. The plan for the link structure is based on a primitive unit called the view area, and AESOP provides a construct named Bento-Box for creating and manipulating view areas. Authors specify spatial and temporal layout within a single Bento-Box and define hyperlinks among the Bento-Boxes.